First Integrated Jury in the South

It appears that James was a member of the petit jury pool for the U. S. District Court in Richmond serving from May to November 1867. “J. Morrissey” is labelled in two photographs.

Please see the photographs at Encyclopedia Virginia via the Valentine Museum:

Photograph #1 (Encyclopedia Virginia notes that the names in this photo are not verified.)

Photograph #2

Photograph #3

An alphabetical list of jurors and details about them based on the photographs. Note how many men are touching others in the photos. There are 13 black and 11 white men.

  1. L. Boyd, photo#3, black
  2. Albert Royal Brooks, #1,3, black
  3. L. Carter, #2, black
  4. Joseph Cox, #2, black
  5. C. P. Fitchett, #2, white
  6. J. R. Fitchett, #2, white
  7. E. Fox, #2, black
  8. J. E. Frazier, #1,2, white
  9. J. Freeman, #2, black
  10. A. Lilly, #1, 3, black
  11. L. Lipscomb, #3, white
  12. Lewis Lindsay, #1, 3, black
  13. Thomas Lucas, #1, 3, black
  14. J. Morrissey, #1, 3, white
  15. W. A. Parsons, #2, white
  16. Dr. W. Scott, #1, 3, black
  17. F. Smith, #2, black
  18. L. Tabb, #1, 3, white
  19. J. Turner, #1, 3, black
  20. John Newton Van Lew, #1, 2, white
  21. B. Wardell, #1, 3, white
  22. Herman L. Wigand, #2, white
  23. _____ Wilburn, #3, white
  24. J. B. Willis, #1, 3, black

Further research reveals much about these 24 men. These are only highlights.

1.  Landon Boyd was born into slavery. It’s suggested that his mother and sister served Virginia Gov. Wyndham Robertson in his household. Mr. Boyd served as a engineer in the U.S. Army in Ohio and was mustered out in Richmond on 16 Nov 1865.1)Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio, Ohio General Assembly, Roster Commission, 1886; database, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 Nov 2016), U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865, Landon Boyd, 1 Nov 1864. There he married and served the African American community as an officer in a freedman’s bank, the vice-president of the Colored National Labor Union and as a member of Richmond City Council from 1872-1873. He died in Abingdon, Virginia in 1899 where he had been a bricklayer.2)“Passed Away,” Richmond Planet newspaper, Richmond, Virginia, 25 Nov 1899, p 4, col 5; digital images, Newspapers.com, (www.newspapers.com : accessed 23 Nov 2016).

2. Albert Royal Brooks was a former slave whose business ventures on behalf of his owner earned him enough money to buy himself, his wife and most of their children. He was a respected man in Richmond, a business owner and philanthropist. He and his wife, Lucy, opened an orphanage for African American children.3)http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Brooks_Albert_Royal_c_1817-1881#start_entry

4. Joseph Cox represented the city of Richmond at the Virginia Constitutional Convention 1867-1868 and was active in Republican politics for several years. 4)http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Cox_Joseph_ca_1835-1880

12. Lewis Lindsey, a former slave and musician, was also a Richmond representative at the Virginia Constitutional Convention of 1867-1868. Later he worked for the U.S. Treasury Department in the Richmond Customs House. He was often the object of ridicule in Virginia newspapers who insisted on recording his speeches phonetically.5)Staunton Spectator newpaper, Staunton, Virginia, 28 Jan 1868, p 1, col 6; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 Nov 2016).6)http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Lindsey_Lewis_1843-1908

14. James Morrissey, see his PROFILES pages on this site.

20. John Newton Van Lew was the brother of Elizabeth Van Lew7)http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Van_Lew_Elizabeth_L_1818-1900, an Richmond abolitionist and famous spy for the Union.

21. Burnham Wardwell was a long-time Richmond businessman from Maine who ran a ice supply business. He was imprisoned in “Castle Godwin” by the Confederates for the duration of the war for his Union sympathies. After the war, he because a vocal proponent of prison reform.8)Scott Reynolds Nelson, Steel Drivin’ Man: John Henry, The Untold Story of an American Legend, (Oxford University Press : New York), p 65-71. He was a Radical Republican politically, he advocated for “perfect equality before the law.”9)“Call for a Convention of Southern Radicals,” Staunton Spectator newspaper, Staunton, Virginia, 17 Jul 1866, p 3, col 2; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : 23 Nov 2016).

22. Herman L. Wigand was branded a carpetbagger from the North, but was a long time Richmond resident from Germany. He was imprisoned in Richmond for treason in Apr 1862.10)“List of Prisoners Confined in ‘Castle Godwin,'” Richmond Dispatch newspaper, 3 Apr 1862, p 2, col 3; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 Nov 2016). He was chosen for the Jefferson Davis grand jury when other men could not serve.11)Staunton Spectator newspaper, Staunton, Virginia, 12 Jun 1866, p 2, col 2; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 Nov 2016).

I will add more profiles as research allows.

Next: Kids

References   [ + ]

1. Official Roster of the Soldiers of the State of Ohio, Ohio General Assembly, Roster Commission, 1886; database, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 Nov 2016), U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, 1861-1865, Landon Boyd, 1 Nov 1864.
2. “Passed Away,” Richmond Planet newspaper, Richmond, Virginia, 25 Nov 1899, p 4, col 5; digital images, Newspapers.com, (www.newspapers.com : accessed 23 Nov 2016).
3. http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Brooks_Albert_Royal_c_1817-1881#start_entry
4. http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Cox_Joseph_ca_1835-1880
5. Staunton Spectator newpaper, Staunton, Virginia, 28 Jan 1868, p 1, col 6; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 Nov 2016).
6. http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Lindsey_Lewis_1843-1908
7. http://www.encyclopediavirginia.org/Van_Lew_Elizabeth_L_1818-1900
8. Scott Reynolds Nelson, Steel Drivin’ Man: John Henry, The Untold Story of an American Legend, (Oxford University Press : New York), p 65-71.
9. “Call for a Convention of Southern Radicals,” Staunton Spectator newspaper, Staunton, Virginia, 17 Jul 1866, p 3, col 2; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : 23 Nov 2016).
10. “List of Prisoners Confined in ‘Castle Godwin,'” Richmond Dispatch newspaper, 3 Apr 1862, p 2, col 3; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 Nov 2016).
11. Staunton Spectator newspaper, Staunton, Virginia, 12 Jun 1866, p 2, col 2; digital images, Newspapers.com (www.newspapers.com : accessed 22 Nov 2016).